Finishing a Persian Rug

Once the weaving is complete, these are the final steps taken to prevent unraveling of the ends (fringes) and the sides (selvedges) in order to protect from wear and tear. Followed by trimming of the pile and cleaning.

We will finish the rug with several rows of wefts, alternating between the right (white) and left (blue) warps across -with no knots- to weave a kilim that will again help decorate the piece and protect the knots over time. The kilim is followed by a couple of rows of double knots – the same as we used to begin the weaving process.

Finally, the warps are cut from the loom on both ends. This “leftover” warp will become the fringe. The length of the fringe depends on where the weaver cuts the material.

Both edges of the rug are covered with wool (a process known as applying an “overcast”), typically matching the color of the border which serves to protect the edges during the life of the rug.

Below is the final product from the front and back. It bears repeating: The appearance of the rug from the front provides no insight into how it was woven.

Video:

If you are curious to learn more, my eBook The Art of Oriental Rugs – A Weaver’s Perspective shows you: 1) how to identify a weave** and how different techniques produce “recognizable” variations in different regions, 2) maps with geographical views of where rugs are woven in the country of Iran and how the regional weaves influence each other, and 3) 750+ close-up pictures of weaves from 170+ rug-weaving regions in Iran and around the globe. This, I humbly hope, will be seen as an indispensable addition to any library.

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Finishing a Persian Rug

These are the final steps, besides trimming and cleaning, taken to prevent unraveling of the ends (fringes) and the sides (selvedges) in order to protect from wear and tear.

We will finish the rug with several rows of wefts, alternating between the right (white) and left (blue) warps across -with no knots- to weave a kilim that will again help decorate the piece and protect the knots over time. The kilim is followed by a couple of rows of double knots – the same as we used to begin the weaving process.

Finally, the warps are cut from the loom on both ends. This “leftover” warp will become the fringe. The length of the fringe depends on where the weaver cuts the material.

Both edges of the rug are covered with wool (a process known as applying an “overcast”), typically matching the color of the border which serves to protect the edges during the life of the rug.

Below is the final product from the front and back. It bears repeating: The appearance of the rug from the front provides no insight into how it was woven.

Video:

If you are curious to learn more, my eBook The Art of Oriental Rugs – A Weaver’s Perspective shows you: 1) how to identify a weave** and how different techniques produce “recognizable” variations in different regions, 2) maps with geographical views of where rugs are woven in the country of Iran and how the regional weaves influence each other, and 3) 750+ close-up pictures of weaves from 170+ rug-weaving regions in Iran and around the globe. This, I humbly hope, will be seen as an indispensable addition to any library.

< previous
Back to lessons
next >