Persian Rug Loom

The loom is a frame to build a foundation in order to begin weaving.

3 major steps in weaving a rug: 1) building a foundation, 2) weaving and 3) finishing the rug. This is part of the first step. The Loom is a frame to build a foundation to begin weaving.

What is a loom?

The loom is the structure or frame supporting the warps on which the rug is woven. It can be made of metal, solid wood or even tree branches, depending on availability. It can also either stand vertical or lie flat on the ground.
To weave a good rug, it’s critical to keep the warp under even tension. Depending on the severity, if the tension is uneven across the loom, it can result in consequences such as ripples in the final product.
The sturdier a loom is, the easier it is to keep an even tension across the warps.

The image below shows a simple drawing of a Tabriz loom used to make some of the pieces in my eBook.
There are several critical parts which make this functional to weave a handmade rug.
The warps are wrapped around the fixed and the adjustable beams. The weaver can adjust the tension on the warps strings by tightening the screws on top of the loom. As mentioned, when applying the warp strings, it is critical to keep the tension as even as possible. Otherwise, many challenges will surface as the weaving progresses.

Here is a picture of the loom I used to weave all the samples shown in my eBook. I mounted it on an old swivel chair frame to allow quick access of the front and back of the rug without much effort. It also allowed me to weave while standing, which reduces stress on the spine.

If you are curious to learn more, my eBook The Art of Oriental Rugs – A Weaver’s Perspective shows you: 1) how to identify a weave** and how different techniques produce “recognizable” variations in different regions, 2) maps with geographical views of where rugs are woven in the country of Iran and how the regional weaves influence each other, and 3) 750+ close-up pictures of weaves from 170+ rug-weaving regions in Iran and around the globe. This, I humbly hope, will be seen as an indispensable addition to any library.

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Persian Rug Loom

The loom is a frame to build a foundation in order to begin weaving.

3 major steps in weaving a rug: 1) building a foundation, 2) weaving and 3) finishing the rug. This is part of the first step. The Loom is a frame to build a foundation to begin weaving.

What is a loom?

The loom is the structure or frame supporting the warps on which the rug is woven. It can be made of metal, solid wood or even tree branches, depending on availability. It can also either stand vertical or lie flat on the ground.
To weave a good rug, it’s critical to keep the warp under even tension. Depending on the severity, if the tension is uneven across the loom, it can result in consequences such as ripples in the final product.
The sturdier a loom is, the easier it is to keep an even tension across the warps.

The image below shows a simple drawing of a Tabriz loom used to make some of the pieces in my eBook.
There are several critical parts which make this functional to weave a handmade rug.
The warps are wrapped around the fixed and the adjustable beams. The weaver can adjust the tension on the warps strings by tightening the screws on top of the loom. As mentioned, when applying the warp strings, it is critical to keep the tension as even as possible. Otherwise, many challenges will surface as the weaving progresses.

Here is a picture of the loom I used to weave all the samples shown in my eBook. I mounted it on an old swivel chair frame to allow quick access of the front and back of the rug without much effort. It also allowed me to weave while standing, which reduces stress on the spine.

If you are curious to learn more, my eBook The Art of Oriental Rugs – A Weaver’s Perspective shows you: 1) how to identify a weave** and how different techniques produce “recognizable” variations in different regions, 2) maps with geographical views of where rugs are woven in the country of Iran and how the regional weaves influence each other, and 3) 750+ close-up pictures of weaves from 170+ rug-weaving regions in Iran and around the globe. This, I humbly hope, will be seen as an indispensable addition to any library.

< previous
Back to lessons
next >